Henry Camarillo

Biological Sciences

Henry received his B.S. in Biology from Brigham Young University. As an undergraduate, he was involved in several research projects studying live-bearing fish of the genus Brachyrhaphis. One of the major projects he was involved with aimed at understanding swimming trade-offs in fish that vary in predation regimes. In this study, he compared if trade-offs occurred between populations of the same species (Brachyrhaphis rhabodophora) that differ in predation levels and between two closely related sister species (Brachyrhaphis roseni& Brachyrhaphis terrabensis) that experience similar differences in selective pressures. While an undergraduate, he also worked as a curatorial assistant at the Monte L. Bean Museum in the museum’s fish collection.

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After completing his undergraduate degree, Henry moved to Kansas State University to pursue a M.S. His thesis focused on the live-bearing fish, Poecilia mexicana, which can be found in both toxic hydrogen sulfide rich environments as well as normal freshwater streams. His thesis aimed at understanding how the combination of different selective pressures can drive morphological adaptations and how this influences different aspects of performance such as swimming and oxygen acquisition.

Henry is broadly interested in evolutionary ecology. He is particularly interested in how the combination of different selective pressures can drive morphological adaptations and how this can impact organismal function and ultimately fitness. While in the IGC program, he hopes to develop various skills in science communication to be able to communicate his research to a broader audience.

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