Mary Lofton is the 2018-2019 Walker Graduate Research Fellow

From the Virginia Water Resources Research Center
July 31, 2018

The Walker Award winner for 2018-19 is Mary Lofton. Mary is a 3rd year Ph.D. candidate in Biological Sciences studying limnology and an Interfaces of Global Change Fellow. Prior to her graduate work at Virginia Tech, Mary worked as a high school Biology and Environmental Science teacher, and was drawn ...

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Hot weather spells trouble for nuclear power plants

From NPR

Nuclear power plants in Europe have been forced to cut back electricity production because of warmer-than-usual seawater.

Plants in Finland, Sweden and Germany have been affected by a heat wave that has broken records in Scandinavia and the British Isles and exacerbated deadly wildfires along the Mediterranean.

Air temperatures have stubbornly lingered above 90 degrees in many parts of Sweden, Finland and Germany, and water ...

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Study explores connections between land management, water quality, and human response in lake catchments

From VT News

July 3, 2018

As many of us prepare to travel to lakes and other bodies of water this summer for relaxation and recreation, now is the perfect time to consider what we can do to help protect the lakes we love.

Scientists have long studied the ecological impact of humans on lakes, but a new study led by researchers at Virginia Tech explores how those ecological impacts can cycle back to affect humans. The study, published in the journal ...

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Congratulations, Dr. Jonathan Doubek!

Congratulations to Dr. Jonathan Doubek in the Department of Biological Sciences, for passing his Ph.D. defense on Thursday, April 26, 2018 in Derring Hall. His dissertation seminar was titled “The effects of hypoxia on zooplankton communities in lakes and reservoirs”.

Jon joined the IGC program and the Carey Lab in Fall 2013, as a Ph.D. candidate studying freshwater biology. His primary research focus is quantifying how multiple stressors (e.g. land use changes, climate change, invasive species and nutrient loading) ...

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Using satellite data recently made public, conservationists may be able to manage the massive industry

From National Geographic

How do you study the world’s more widespread predator? By spying from space.

When a team of researchers set out to see how prevalent industrial fishing was around the world—who was fishing where and when—they were met with a dearth of information.

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