Coastal@VT hosted Rotating Resilience Roundtables to address issues of coastal resilience in Virginia

As illustrated by recent hurricanes Florence and Michael, it is now more important than ever for the research and stakeholder communities of Virginia to come together to plan and prepare for such hazards as hurricanes, increased precipitation, and accelerated river and coastal flooding.

The coastal zone hosts more than half of the world’s population, large port facilities vital to the global economy, and military installations important to national ...

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Water experts to study emerging threat of antibiotic resistance

Through the awarding of two contracts, the Centers for Disease Control is tapping the expertise of Amy Pruden and Marc Edwards in a wider effort to address emerging public health priorities.

Bacteria that become resistant to antibiotics lead to an estimated 23,000 deaths and 2 million illnesses per year in the U.S. The Centers for Disease Control is launching an ...

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People Need Lakes and Lakes Need People

After Hurricane Florence hit the southeast coast last month, Claytor Lake, hundreds of miles away in southwestern Virginia, took a hit.  More than fifteen tons of debris ended up in the lake – everything from the usual ‘flotsam and jetsam’ to at least one toilet, a mannequin, and an empty boat.

This part of Virginia is not home to very many lakes, and ...

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Virginia Tech researchers receive NSF grant to study parental care in eastern hellbender salamanders

From VT News

Although eastern hellbender salamanders are known by many unflattering nicknames — mud puppy, snot otter, grampus, and Allegheny alligator —  about 70 percent of adult male hellbenders should more accurately be known as doting fathers.

Unlike most wildlife species, male hellbenders provide exclusive care for their young for an extended period of seven months.

William Hopkins, professor of wildlife in the College of Natural Resources and Environment, is the principal ...

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Students examine impacts of pipeline construction through ecological and cultural lens

From VT News

Virginia Tech faculty and eight undergraduate students from universities around the country spent the summer monitoring ecological and social impacts of Mountain Valley Pipeline construction, which bisects rivers, streams, wetlands, and national forest.

The interstate pipeline, designed to transport natural gas from West Virginia through five Virginia counties, has been the subject of factious debate for years.

The students participated in a Virginia Tech Research and Extension Experiences for Undergraduates (REEU) program ...

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Virginia Tech researcher to study the effects of drying streams

From VT News

Virginia Tech researcher, Meryl Mims, is the co-principal investigator on one of the first large-scale coordinated ecology research projects to study what happens to streams as they dry across the United States.

Mims, an assistant professor in the Department of  Biological Sciences in the College of Science, received a new grant from the MacroSystems Biology program of the National Science Foundation (NSF). The grant is budgeted for ...

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Beavers—Once Nearly Extinct—Could Help Fight Climate Change

The English language is replete with idioms about beavers, like “beaver away” or “busy as a beaver,” all signifying hard work and industry. In his new book, Eager, Ben Goldfarb takes us inside the amazing world of nature’s premier construction engineer—which can create dams as long as half a mile—and shows us ...

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