Water experts to study emerging threat of antibiotic resistance

Through the awarding of two contracts, the Centers for Disease Control is tapping the expertise of Amy Pruden and Marc Edwards in a wider effort to address emerging public health priorities.

Bacteria that become resistant to antibiotics lead to an estimated 23,000 deaths and 2 million illnesses per year in the U.S. The Centers for Disease Control is launching an ...

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Conservationists get a billion dollars. Here’s how it may help.

Humans are rapidly taming the world’s wild places.

In the past century, nearly 80 percent of all land has been modified or impacted by human development. As a result, other species have rapidly declined. One study estimates animals are going extinct 1,000 times faster than they would have without human influence.

To ...

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Changing climate forces desperate Guatemalans to migrate

Eduardo Méndez López lifts his gaze to the sky, hoping to see clouds laden with rain.

After months of subsisting almost exclusively on plain corn tortillas and salt, his eyes and cheeks appear sunken in, his skin stretched thin over bone. The majority of his neighbors look the same.

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People Need Lakes and Lakes Need People

After Hurricane Florence hit the southeast coast last month, Claytor Lake, hundreds of miles away in southwestern Virginia, took a hit.  More than fifteen tons of debris ended up in the lake – everything from the usual ‘flotsam and jetsam’ to at least one toilet, a mannequin, and an empty boat.

This part of Virginia is not home to very many lakes, and ...

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Bill Gates launches effort to help the world adapt to climate change

In Bangladesh, low-lying and vulnerable to yearly flooding, farmers are shifting from raising chickens to raising ducks. Ducks can swim.

In the Philippines, where half the mangrove forests have been lost to development, biologists are replanting the trees to recreate nature’s protective coastal shield against deadly typhoons. The gnarled tangle of mangrove roots slows the movement of ...

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Virginia Tech Science Festival returns Oct. 27

From VT News

The Virginia Tech Science Festival returns to campus Saturday, Oct. 27, with 93 free hands-on, minds-on learning interactive booths and activities that showcase dozens of science education and research programs throughout the university, including physics, space, engineering, communication, geology, health and medicine, history, transportation, computers, chemistry, and more.

Events will be held in the Moss Arts CenterCarol M. Newman LibraryTorgersen Hall, and along Alumni Mall. Parking ...

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Virginia Tech researchers receive NSF grant to study parental care in eastern hellbender salamanders

From VT News

Although eastern hellbender salamanders are known by many unflattering nicknames — mud puppy, snot otter, grampus, and Allegheny alligator —  about 70 percent of adult male hellbenders should more accurately be known as doting fathers.

Unlike most wildlife species, male hellbenders provide exclusive care for their young for an extended period of seven months.

William Hopkins, professor of wildlife in the College of Natural Resources and Environment, is the principal ...

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Professor appointed chair for National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine committee

From VT News

William A. Hopkins, professor of wildlife in the College of Natural Resources and Environment, has been appointed chair to a committee of The National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine: The Review of the U.S. Geological Survey’s Laboratories: Processes, Procedures, and Best Practices to Meet National Needs.

Hopkins will chair the committee for the duration of a 30-month analysis of all U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) laboratory facilities.

Hopkins, who ...

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Climate change impacts worse than expected, global report warns

The impacts and costs of 2.7 degrees Fahrenheit (1.5 degrees Celsius) of global warming will be far greater than expected, according to a comprehensive assessment by the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC) released Sunday in Incheon, South Korea.

The past decade has seen an astonishing run of record-breaking storms, forest fires, droughts,

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Students examine impacts of pipeline construction through ecological and cultural lens

From VT News

Virginia Tech faculty and eight undergraduate students from universities around the country spent the summer monitoring ecological and social impacts of Mountain Valley Pipeline construction, which bisects rivers, streams, wetlands, and national forest.

The interstate pipeline, designed to transport natural gas from West Virginia through five Virginia counties, has been the subject of factious debate for years.

The students participated in a Virginia Tech Research and Extension Experiences for Undergraduates (REEU) program ...

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A Watershed Moment for Conservation in the New River Valley, Virginia

From the New River Land Trust

September 18, 2018

In 1909, John B. Laing purchased a large property on Big Mountain in Giles County.  Even at that time, he recognized the area was special. He wrote, “There is not any place that I know of that I would get more pleasure in protecting for the future than I would in Little Stony Creek watershed. Mountain streams like that are very scarce and in the future will be more so.”

His great-grandchildren made ...

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12th Annual Sustainability Week: Sept. 15-23

From VT News

The 12th annual Sustainability Week, an interactive partnership among Virginia Tech Office of Sustainability, the Town of Blacksburg, and Sustainable Blacksburg that highlights sustainability efforts in the community and on campus, will launch on Saturday, Sept. 15.

More than 20 events are scheduled throughout the week of Sept. 15-23. On Wednesday, Sept. ...

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Hog Farmers Scramble to Drain Waste Pools Ahead Of Hurricane Florence

Just inland from the North Carolina coast, right in the path of Hurricane Florence, there’s an area where there are many more pigs than people. Each big hog farm has one or more open-air “lagoons” filled with manure, and some could be vulnerable to flooding if the hurricane brings as much rain as feared.

Katy Langley lives downstream from ...

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Disaster aid: new research uses analytics to improve placement of supplies

From VT News

When disaster strikes, having relief supplies in the right place to be deployed swiftly is critical.

Humanitarian relief agencies often position such supplies in advance to help ensure ready availability but lack a good way to gauge the effectiveness of such preparations.

It’s difficult to know what quantities of supplies will be needed and where they should be placed to be most effective, particularly given the uncertainty about where and when a ...

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