Biological Sciences’ Frank Aylward awarded Simons Foundation grant to study evolution of oceans

From VT NewsMay 24, 2019

Frank O. Aylward, an assistant professor with the Department of Biological Sciences in the Virginia Tech College of Science, has been awarded a Simons Early Career Investigator in Marine Microbial Ecology and Evolution Award.

The three-year, $540,000 grant will help Aylward to understand evolutionary trends in prokaryotes and the roles they play in carbon and nitrogen cycling, and other biogeochemical processes ...

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Researchers examine how the laws of physics impact evolution

From VT News

Think about the fast sprint of a cheetah or the rapid undulation of a swimming fish.

All biological motion is dependent on the rules of mechanics, which is a branch of physics that deals with the motion of material bodies and the forces exerted upon them.

But, how do the static laws of physics impact the dynamic process of evolution? Do stronger relationships between a morphological trait and swimming speed, for example, ...

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Study: Genetic variation can leave long-lasting stamp on evolutionary patterns

From VT News

[Featured image: An Anolis evermanni lizard, photo courtesy Edmund D. Brodie III.]

A new study from Virginia Tech takes on the decades-old battle of which has more impact on evolution: genetic variation or natural selection.

In a study published in the latest issue of Evolution Letters, Virginia Tech researcher Joel McGlothlin has found that genetic variation can leave a much longer-lasting stamp on evolutionary patterns ...

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Martha Munoz settles decades-old evolutionary biology question

From VT News:

Evolution can be both stimulated and halted by an animal’s behavior, it just depends which trait you’re talking about, according to a groundbreaking study led by a Virginia Tech researcher.

The study, published Oct. 25 in the journal American Naturalist, shows behavior can be both a brake and a motor for evolution in a manner where slowing evolution in one trait actually requires accelerating evolution in another, according to Martha ...

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Joel McGlothlin’s research on snake resistance to tetrodotoxin featured in the Atlantic Magazine

From VT News

A select group of garter snakes can thank their ancestors for the ability to chow down on a poisonous newt and live to tell the tale.

Common garter snakes, along with four other snake species, have evolved the ability to eat extremely toxic species such as the rough-skinned newt — amphibians that would kill a human predator — thanks to at least 100 million years of evolution, according to Joel McGlothlin, an assistant professor of biological sciences ...

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