The Search For Giant, Rare Salamanders That Live In Georgia

(Header image: Juvenile hellbender salamander. Photo by Bita Honarvar for WABE)

In the deep woods of the Blue Ridge Mountains, a cold, clear stream flows. Below a canopy of twisted rhododendrons, seven people in black wetsuits creep upstream through the water. They look like Gollum, sleek in their neoprene, crouching in the water, feeling under rocks.

They’re looking for a kind of giant salamander known as ...

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Surface water and flood dynamics increase vulnerability to waterborne disease and climate change

Diarrheal disease, a preventable and treatable illness, remains the second-leading cause of death in children under the age of 5 and a persistent public health threat in sub-Saharan Africa.

Researchers have now uncovered how surface water dynamics may increase the vulnerability of dependent populations to diarrheal disease and climate change.

Kathleen Alexander, professor of wildlife in Virginia Tech’s College of ...

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Coastal@VT hosted Rotating Resilience Roundtables to address issues of coastal resilience in Virginia

As illustrated by recent hurricanes Florence and Michael, it is now more important than ever for the research and stakeholder communities of Virginia to come together to plan and prepare for such hazards as hurricanes, increased precipitation, and accelerated river and coastal flooding.

The coastal zone hosts more than half of the world’s population, large port facilities vital to the global economy, and military installations important to national ...

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Conservationists get a billion dollars. Here’s how it may help.

Humans are rapidly taming the world’s wild places.

In the past century, nearly 80 percent of all land has been modified or impacted by human development. As a result, other species have rapidly declined. One study estimates animals are going extinct 1,000 times faster than they would have without human influence.

To ...

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Changing climate forces desperate Guatemalans to migrate

Eduardo Méndez López lifts his gaze to the sky, hoping to see clouds laden with rain.

After months of subsisting almost exclusively on plain corn tortillas and salt, his eyes and cheeks appear sunken in, his skin stretched thin over bone. The majority of his neighbors look the same.

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Bill Gates launches effort to help the world adapt to climate change

In Bangladesh, low-lying and vulnerable to yearly flooding, farmers are shifting from raising chickens to raising ducks. Ducks can swim.

In the Philippines, where half the mangrove forests have been lost to development, biologists are replanting the trees to recreate nature’s protective coastal shield against deadly typhoons. The gnarled tangle of mangrove roots slows the movement of ...

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Climate change impacts worse than expected, global report warns

The impacts and costs of 2.7 degrees Fahrenheit (1.5 degrees Celsius) of global warming will be far greater than expected, according to a comprehensive assessment by the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC) released Sunday in Incheon, South Korea.

The past decade has seen an astonishing run of record-breaking storms, forest fires, droughts,

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Virginia Climate Crisis Forum: Solutions to Climate Change

Virginia Climate Crisis Forum: Solutions to Climate Change

Tuesday, September 18, 2018

7:30 PM (doors open at 7 PM)

James Madison High School, 2500 James Madison Drive, Vienna VA 22181

Register: bit.ly/FACSclimateforum

 

Join the discussion of how Virginia is being and will be affected by climate change at the Virginia Climate Crisis Forum, hosted by Faith Alliance for Climate Solutions. Featured speakers are the 2018 candidates for U.S. Senator from Virginia: U.S. ...

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Virginia Tech researcher to study the effects of drying streams

From VT News

Virginia Tech researcher, Meryl Mims, is the co-principal investigator on one of the first large-scale coordinated ecology research projects to study what happens to streams as they dry across the United States.

Mims, an assistant professor in the Department of  Biological Sciences in the College of Science, received a new grant from the MacroSystems Biology program of the National Science Foundation (NSF). The grant is budgeted for ...

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Beavers—Once Nearly Extinct—Could Help Fight Climate Change

The English language is replete with idioms about beavers, like “beaver away” or “busy as a beaver,” all signifying hard work and industry. In his new book, Eager, Ben Goldfarb takes us inside the amazing world of nature’s premier construction engineer—which can create dams as long as half a mile—and shows us ...

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Sea level rise is already costing property owners on the coast

Elizabeth Boineau’s 1939 Colonial sits a block and a half from the Ashley River in a sought-after neighborhood of ancient live oaks, charming gardens and historic homes. A year ago, she thought she could sell it for nearly $1 million. But after dropping the price 11 times, Boineau has decided to tear ...

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Hot weather spells trouble for nuclear power plants

From NPR

Nuclear power plants in Europe have been forced to cut back electricity production because of warmer-than-usual seawater.

Plants in Finland, Sweden and Germany have been affected by a heat wave that has broken records in Scandinavia and the British Isles and exacerbated deadly wildfires along the Mediterranean.

Air temperatures have stubbornly lingered above 90 degrees in many parts of Sweden, Finland and Germany, and water ...

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Coastal cities are already suffering from “climate gentrification”

Though some may still deny it, climate change is having an effect on our lives. It’s making weather patterns more severe and unpredictable, and in some parts of the world, agricultural practices and natural ecosystems are collapsing. And in other places, it’s going to make things really expensive.

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