Dr. Madeline Schreiber

Geosciences

Dr. Schreiber’s research program at Virginia Tech focuses on chemical hydrogeology. She and her students study the hydrologic and biogeochemical processes that influence the cycling and attenuation of naturally-occurring and anthropogenic sources of contaminants.  In the context of global change, Dr. Schreiber is interested in how hydrologic shifts in relation to climate change influences groundwater-surface water interactions, and in turn, biogeochemical processes in aquifers.

Dr. Schreiber is a Professor in the Department of Geosciences at Virginia Tech.  She is an Associate Editor for the journal Groundwater, and is currently on the management board of the Hydrogeology Division of the Geological Society of America.


At Virginia Tech, Dr. Schreiber teaches undergraduate courses in Resources Geology, Geoscience Fundamentals, and Groundwater Hydrology. At the graduate level, she teaches courses in Chemical Hydrogeology, Karst Hydrology, Methods in Hydrogeology, and other special topics.

Email address             Lab Website

 

Recent Relevant Publications

Levitan DM* Schreiber ME, Seal RR, Zipper C, Donavan P, Bodnar RJ, Aylor J.  2014. Environmental baseline characterization of an undeveloped ore deposit: An example from the Coles Hill uranium deposit, Virginia, USA.  Applied Geochemistry. DOI10.1016/j.apgeochem.2014.02.007

Chermak J and ME Schreiber. 2014. Mineralogy and Trace Element Geochemistry of Gas Shales in the United States: Environmental Implications. International Journal of Coal Geology. DOI: 10.1016/j.coal.2013.12.005

Basu A and ME Schreiber. 2013.  Arsenic release from arsenopyrite weathering: Insights from sequential extraction and microscopic studies. Journal of Hazardous Materials 262: 896-904.

Oyewumi O and ME Schreiber.  2012. Release of trace elements from poultry litter: Insights from a field experiment on the Delmarva Peninsula, Delaware. Applied Geochemistry 27: 1979-1990.

West NR, Schreiber ME, Gotkowitz M.  2012. Experimental studies of arsenic release from chlorine-promoted oxidation of pyrite.  Applied Geochemistry. 27: 2215-2224.

Ciparis S, Schreiber M, Voshell, R. 2011. Using watershed characteristics, sediment, and tissue of resident mollusks to identify potential sources of trace elements to streams in a complex agricultural landscape. Environmental Monitoring and Assessment 184:3109–3126

Diesel E, Schreiber M, Van der Meer JR.  2009.  Development of arsenic sensors for natural waters.  Analytical and Bioanalytical Chemistry 394 (3):  687-693.

Schwartz BF and ME Schreiber.  2009.  Quantifying recharge in mantled sinkholes using ERT.  Ground Water 47(3): 370-381.

Schwartz BF*, Schreiber ME, Yan T*.  2008. Field-scale soil moisture quantification using electrical resistivity tomography.  Journal of Hydrology 362(3-4): 234-246.

For a complete list of published work, please see Dr. Schreiber’s website.

 

Below, Dr. Schreiber discusses the relationship between groundwater chemistry and arsenic release.

Groundwater/Rock Interactions – Virginia Tech from VirginiaTech on Vimeo.