Dr. John Seiler

Forest Resources and Environmental Conservation

John Seiler has been a member of the faculty at Virginia Tech in the Department of Forest Resources and Environmental Conservation at Virginia Tech since 1985. His research interests include the effects of various environmental impacts on tree biology and growth. Along with his graduate students and colleagues, Dr. Seiler has published over 110 refereed articles in this area. Other areas of his research have included water stress, acid rain, ozone and elevated CO2 effects on forest trees.

His most recent research is investigating the role that managed tree ecosystems can play in sequestering atmospheric CO.  He was a key member of a team of researchers investigating how to improve measurements of soil CO2 efflux forests.  Empirical models of soil COefflux developed by his graduate students are being used to improve models of net ecosystem productivity in the southeastern U.S.


In addition, Dr. Seiler has a very active teaching and curriculum development program.  He teaches a wide range of classes and has lead a team which has developed numerous multimedia teaching and tutorial programs. The on-line multimedia tutorial Woody Plants in North America likely contains the single largest collection of photographs (estimated at over 25,000) for trees throughout North America.  They have also developed a smartphone app for Android and iPhones that has become the most widely downloaded tree identification app on the respective platforms (search for Virginia Tech Tree Identification at your app store).

Dr. Seiler holds an endowed chair at Virginia Tech in the Department of Forest Resources and Environmental Conservation named in honor of the Honorable and Mrs. Shelton H. Short, Jr. from Southside, Virginia. He has also been named a University Alumni Distinguished Professor.

Dr. Seiler completed his education at The Pennsylvania State University BS (1979), Forest Science; BS (1979), Environmental Resource Management; MS (1981) Forest Biology; and Virginia Tech PhD. (1984) Tree Physiology.

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