STUDY ABROAD ECUADOR! Spring 2018

Dr. Ignacio Moore (BIOL) and Dr. William Hopkins (FWC) are offering “Tropical Ecology & Conservation BIOL 3954/FIW 3954 (6 credits)” in Spring and Summer I 2018. The course is open to all majors. The Spring course will be taught on campus.

During Summer I, the class will travel to Ecuador where students will traverse multiple ecosystems, from the Amazonian lowland rainforest to the high altitude Andes. Students will visit one of the most biodiverse countries in the world, and ...

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Cayelan Carey and Madeline Schreiber receive Junior Faculty Awards

Dr. Cayelan Carey and Dr. Madeline Schreiber recently received a Junior Faculty Award from the Institute for Critical Technology and Applied Science. Their project is titled: Rapid elemental fluxes in freshwater systems.

The Junior Faculty Award program provides seed funds for innovative research led by pre-tenure faculty, which supports early-stage projects with the potential to evolve into groundbreaking research programs. It also encourages the formation of collaborative teams that can leverage a broad range of perspectives to bring a fresh approach ...

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Congratulations, Dr. Timpano!

Interfaces of Global Change Fellow, Tony Timpano, successfully defended his Ph.D. dissertation on Tuesday, August 29, 2017, in Fralin Hall Auditorium.

His seminar was titled: “Toward Improved Assessment of Freshwater Salinization as a Benthic Macroinvertebrate Stressor.”

Tony is pictured above with committee members Dr. Stephen Schoenholtz, Dr. Dave Soucek, and Dr. Carl Zipper. (Not pictured: Dr. Bryan Brown)

Congratulations, Dr. Tony Timpano!

Tony's Dissertation Defense

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Hitching The Sun and Wind: new fall seminar series

The Renewable Energy Facility More Sustainable Siting Project is pleased to announce a new fall seminar series!

The first event of our fall speaker series is this Wednesday, August 30, 2017 at 1:25 – 2:15 p.m. in Burruss Hall 120A.

Please see the flyer below. You are welcome to attend and participate in the discussion.

Please note there will be speakers every Wednesday throughout the semester, same time, same place!

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Tony Timpano to give his Ph.D. seminar on Tuesday, August 29th at 9 am

IGC Fellow, Tony Timpano will defend his Ph.D. dissertation on Tuesday morning, August 29, 2017, at 9:00 a.m. in Fralin Hall Auditorium.

His seminar title is: “Toward Improved Assessment of Freshwater Salinization as a Benthic Macroinvertebrate Stressor.”

Please join us! Coffee and refreshments will be served beginning at 8:30 a.m.

Related:

Tony Timpano’s work in water quality research is at the intersection of science and policy

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Dinosaur unpacking party: August 31st in Museum of Geosciences

From VT News

The Virginia Tech Paleobiology Research Group had a busy summer in Africa and the western United States, and now they’re inviting the public to a party to unpack their specimens, which include dinosaurs, phytosaurs, and other reptiles.

The unpacking party will be be from 6:30 p.m. to 8:30 p.m., Aug. 31, at the Museum of Geosciences in 2062 Derring Hall.  Derring Hall is located at 926 West Campus Drive, Blacksburg.

“This is a unique opportunity to become a citizen-scientist and ...

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Mary Lofton is honored with two awards for her research on water quality in reservoirs

Congratulations to Mary Lofton, who received the Leo Bourassa Award from the Virginia Lakes and Watershed Association for her research on the effects of water quality management on phytoplankton blooms in Virginia reservoirs! This award was chosen based on her contributions to the field of water resources in the commonwealth of Virginia and goes to the top graduate student doing water research in VA!

On top of this honor, Mary also received the $5000 grant from the Virginia Water Resources ...

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Climate change impacts airline schedules

From The Washington Post:

Rising Temperatures could bump you from your flight

Over three days in late June, American Airlines canceled 57 regional flights out of Phoenix due to extreme heat of 120 degrees Fahrenheit. More heat waves in the future could mean flights get canceled, delayed or have to lose some weight. That weight could be you.

In the aviation business, really hot days are called “weight restriction days,” because when it’s hot, fully loaded planes can’t get off the ground. There’s ...

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Zach Easton develops models to help urban areas plan for increased water pollution in the Chesapeake

Dr. Zachary Easton was recently interviewed on NPR about climate change and water quality:

Listen to this interview at NPR
Researcher Develops Models to Help Urban Areas Plan for Increased Pollution of Chesapeake Bay

Virginia Tech researchers say the cost to reduce pollution will increase with climate change, and are working on models to help urban planners develop management practices early enough to make a difference.

Zachary Easton is a lead project investigator for Virginia Tech who says most Americans don’t believe ...

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Second annual IGC Graduate Research Symposium was a great success

The second annual Interfaces of Global Change (IGC) Graduate Research Symposium was held on April 21, 2017 in Fralin Hall. The symposium provided a forum for students and faculty to interact and explore connections between labs across campus. The day included 9 oral presentations, a poster session, and a keynote address by former U.S. Congressman, Bob Inglis.

The symposium highlighted the latest research from the program’s graduate student fellows, whose collective work addresses critical global changes impacting the environment and society. ...

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Climate change is trouble for cutthroat trout in the Rockies

From NPR:

There’s an unplanned experiment going on in the northern Rocky Mountains. What’s happening is that spring is arriving earlier, and it’s generally warmer and drier than usual. And that’s messing with some of the fish that live there.

The fish is the iconic cutthroat trout. It’s a native North American fish that thrives in cold, small streams. Explorer Meriwether Lewis of Lewis and Clark Expedition fame was among the first ...

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Michelle Stocker, Sterling Nesbitt fill in the fossil record of phytosaurs

From VT News

The skeleton of a small, short-snouted reptile found in China was recently identified as the oldest known member of the phytosaurs — an extinct group of large, semi-aquatic reptiles that superficially resembled the distantly-related crocodylians and lived during the Triassic Period, approximately 250 million years ago to 200 million years ago.

Virginia Tech researchers led the team that re-evaluated and re-classified the animal, Diandongosuchus fuyuanensis, which had previously ...

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Stocker & Nesbitt present: World premiere of new reptile fossils from Africa and China

For decades, scientists have wondered what the earliest dinosaur relatives looked like and what other species they are most closely related to. Now, Virginia Tech researchers shed new light on the early history of these relatives, with new discoveries that overturn popular predictions and current knowledge, as well as fill critical gaps in the fossil record.

Leading this work are paleobiologists Sterling Nesbitt and Michelle Stocker, both assistant professors of geosciences in the College of Science and members of the Read More →

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Every relevant federal agency to be led by climate change skeptics

From The Guardian

December 12, 2016 | The heads of Donald Trump’s transition teams for Nasa, the Environmental Protection Agency, the Department of the Interior and the Department of Energy, as well as his nominees to lead the EPA and the Department of the Interior, all question the science of human-caused climate change, in a signal of the president-elect’s determination to embark upon an aggressively pro-fossil fuels agenda.

Trump has assembled a transition team in which at least nine ...

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Ashley Dayer shows that citizen scientists’ data can be used for bird conservation

Dr. Ashley Dayer is a conservation social scientist and new faculty hire in the Department of Fish and Wildlife Conservation at Virginia Tech. Dr. Dayer is also a new affiliated faculty member in the Global Change Center.  Her most recent publication in the journal Biological Conservation was highlighted in the following article on Cornell’s All About Birds website.


From All About Birds:

Save an endangered species, protect eagles from wind turbines, expand protected lands, or even outlaw drones from bothering wildlife. It doesn’t matter who you ...

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Joel McGlothlin’s research on snake resistance to tetrodotoxin featured in the Atlantic Magazine

From VT News

A select group of garter snakes can thank their ancestors for the ability to chow down on a poisonous newt and live to tell the tale.

Common garter snakes, along with four other snake species, have evolved the ability to eat extremely toxic species such as the rough-skinned newt — amphibians that would kill a human predator — thanks to at least 100 million years of evolution, according to Joel McGlothlin, an assistant professor of biological sciences ...

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Peer J offers free open access publishing for scientists

From VT News

When Professor Ignacio Moore, of biological sciences, and his research team heard about PeerJ through social media, they connected with the open access publishing philosophy. Even better, their research about a low-cost, automated playback recording system for use in behavioral ecology was accepted for publication in the journal.

PeerJ is an award-winning, leading peer-reviewed open access scholarly journal for biological and medical sciences — a perfect fit for Moore’s research.

“This paper is essentially a methodological publication, and with ...

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Ed Fox and team receive grant for big data research

From VT News:

Every moment data is created.

When a member of the Flint Water Study team tests and records results from a drop of water. When a student steps into Goodwin Hall, activating sensors to track usability and traffic patterns.

But data, especially big data that has to be analyzed computationally, sometimes creates as many questions as it answers. Where does it all go? How do we store it? Who pays to store it? What kind of computer do we need ...

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