Dr. Brian Strahm

Forest Resources and Environmental Conservation

Brian Strahm is an associate professor in the Department of Forest Resources and Environmental Conservation.  He received a doctoral degree in forest resources from the University of Washington and a bachelor’s degree in biology from the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill. His research focuses on the soil properties and processes that regulate productivity and environmental quality.

Forests cover approximately one-third of the Earth’s land surface and are important focal points for the supply of ecosystem goods and services. In forests, as with nearly all terrestrial ecosystems, soils are the hub of biological and chemical activity. Specifically, soils are largely responsible for the sustained productivity of forest ecosystems and regulate key processes that influence larger-scale environmental conditions, such as water quality and atmospheric chemistry. By understanding the relationships between forest ecosystems and external forces, such as forest management, land use, or global change, scientists can predict how these changes affect soil/ecosystem function, such as carbon sequestration and nitrogen leaching.


Dr. Strahm’s recent research examines

  • the role of forest soils in the adaptation of southern pine ecosystems to climate variation
  • how to return natural processes to ecosystems that have been severely altered by mining
  • ways to utilize reclaimed lands to bring the American Chestnut tree back to North America

Website     Email

 

Recent Publications

Minick, K.J., B.D. Strahm, T.R. Fox, E.B. Sucre, and Z.H. Leggett.  2015.  Microbial nitrogen cycling responses to forest-based bioenergy production.  Ecol. Appl. (in press)

Heim, B.C., J.R. Seiler, and B.D. Strahm. 2015.  Root non-structural carbohydrates and their relationship with autotrophic respiration of loblolly pine (Pinus taeda).  Commun. Soil Sci. Plant Anal. DOI 10.1080/00103624.2015.1011752.

Shrestha, R., B.D. Strahm, and E.B. Sucre.  2014.  Invited Review:  Greenhouse gas emissions in response to nitrogen fertilization in managed forest ecosystems.  New Forests.  DOI 10.1007/s11056-014-9454-4.

Shrestha, R.K., B. Strahm, E. Sucre, S. Holub, and N. Meehan. 2014. Fertilizer management, parent material, and stand age influence greenhouse gas flux in Pacific Northwest Douglas-fir ecosystems. Soil Sci. Soc. Am. J.  78:2041-2053.

Nave, L.E., J.P. Sparks, J. Le Moine, B.S. Hardiman, K.J. Nadelhoffer, J.M., Tallant, C.S. Vogel, B.D. Strahm, and P.S. Curtis.  2014.  Changes in soil nitrogen cycling in a northern temperate forest ecosystem during succession.  Biogeochem.  121:471-488.

Shrestha, R., B.D. Strahm, and E.B. Sucre.  2014.  Nitrous oxide fluxes in fertilized Pinus taeda plantations across a gradient of soil drainage classes.  J. Envir. Qual.  43:1823–1832.

Stein, B.R., V.A. Thomas, L.J. Lorentz, and B.D. Strahm.  2014.  Predicting macronutrient concentrations from loblolly pine leaf reflectance across local and regional scales.  GIScience and Remote Sensing.  51: 269-287.

Vance, E.D., W.M. Aust, R.E. Froese, R.B. Harrison, L.A. Morris, and B.D. Strahm.  2014.  Biomass harvesting and soil productivity:  Is the science meeting our policy needs?  Soil Sci. Soc. Am. J.  doi:10.2136/sssaj2013.08.0323nafsc.

Chen, Y., S.D. Day, R.K. Shrestha, B.D. Strahm, and P.E. Wiseman. 2014. Influence of urban land development and soil rehabilitation on soil-atmosphere greenhouse gas fluxes. Geoderma 226-227:348-353.

Campbell, C.D., J.R. Seiler, P.E. Wiseman, B.D. Strahm, and J.F. Munsell.  2014.  Soil carbon dynamics in residential lawns converted from Appalachian mixed oak stands.  Forests 5:425-438.

Minick, K.J., B.D. Strahm, T.R. Fox, E.B. Sucre, and Z.H. Leggett.  2014.  Switchgrass intercropping reduces soil inorganic nitrogen in a young loblolly pine plantation located in coastal North Carolina.  For. Ecol. Manage. 319:161-168.

Passauer, D.P., W.M. Aust, M.C. Bolding, B.D. Strahm, J.A. Burger, S.C. Patterson, E.D. Vance, E.T. Roberts.  2013.  Potential above-ground biomass losses from severe soil rutting during wet weather timber harvests of Coastal Plain loblolly pine (Pinus taeda) plantations mitigated by mechanical site preparation.  For. Ecol. Manage. 307:266-273.

Liu, X.J., J. Fike, J. Galbraith, W. Fike, D. Parrish, G. Evanylo, and B. Strahm. 2013.  Effects of harvest frequency and biosolids application on switchgrass yield, feedstock quality, and theoretical ethanol yield.  Global Change Biology – Bioenergy. doi:10.1111/gcbb.12124.

Chen, Y., S.D. Day, A.F. Wick, B.D. Strahm, P.E. Wiseman, and W.L. Daniels.  2013.  Changes in soil carbon pools and microbial biomass from urban land development and subsequent post-development soil rehabilitation.  Soil Biol. & Biochem. 66:38-44.

McKee, S.E, W.M. Aust, J.R. Seiler, B.D. Strahm, E.B. Schilling, S. Brooks.  2013.  Carbon Pools and Fluxes in a Tupelo (Nyssa aquatica)-Baldcypress (Taxodium Distichum) Swamp 24-Years after Harvest Disturbances.  Biomass & Bioenergy 55:130-140.

Passauer, D.P., W.M. Aust, M.C. Bolding, B.D. Strahm, J.A. Burger, S.C. Patterson, E.D. Vance, E.T. Roberts.  2013.  Potential above-ground biomass losses from severe soil rutting during wet weather timber harvests of coastal plain loblolly pine (Pinus taeda) plantations mitigated by mechanical site preparation.  For. Ecol. Manage. 307:266-273.

Christie, A.M., W.M. Aust, S.M. Zedaker, B.D. Strahm.  2013.  Potential Erosion from Bladed Firelines in the Appalachian Region Estimated with USLE-Forest and WEPP Models.  S. J. Appl. For. 37:140-147.

Evans, D.M., C.E. Zipper, J.A. Burger, B.D. Strahm, A.M. Villamagna.  2013.  Reforestation practice for enhancement of ecosystem services on a compacted surface mine: Path toward ecosystem recovery.  Ecol. Eng.  51:16-23.

Wear, L.R., W.M. Aust, M.C. Bolding, B.D. Strahm, A. Dolloff.  2013.  Effectiveness of Best Management Practices for Sediment Reduction at Operational Forest Stream Crossings.  For. Ecol. Manage.  289: 551-561.